thedsgnblog:

Parallel   |   http://behance.net/byparallel

“We decided to change the concept by using a new packaging system focused on the substrate and product speech. This will lead to a more natural feel of the product, being able to see it and almost taste it by its natural colors and textures. The logotype was re-designed to make it modern and adjust some old aspects of the first logotype. We decided to conserve the rounded shape and the rounded typography making it more playful and fun. Using just the traditional “rosa mexicano” we designed a vibrant but sophisticated color palette, leading to a more specific target; a traditional brand adjusted to modern times.”

Based in Guadalajara, Mexico, this Creative agency is dedicated to improve brand experiences. Focused on branding, art direction and packaging.

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thedsgnblog:

Costas Papaconstantinou   |   http://cozats.com

“Coding cards - applying tags in life.”

I’m Costas Papaconstantinou, a graphic designer located in Athens, Greece. Currently I’m working at Spot JWT,  and also do selected freelance work. I have expertise in desktop publishing  and logo design/corporate ID. + some experience with html/CSS and 3D. I mainly use Adobe Illusrator/ Indesign/ Photoshop and Blender3D and work on Windows/Mac/Linux. I’m also an amateur photography lover. I love new technologies, and everything open source, and I’m a passionate internet/social media user, so feel free to contact me about anything.

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thedsgnblog:

Ella Zheng   |   http://behance.net/ellaisweird

“This is the Destination: Play Starter Kit. All the items here are to guide designers to move out of their comfort zone with a more playful mind set! The Post it Pads and Never Stop Learning Poster acts as Playful reminders for designers to complete their out of the comfort zone task. The activity book guides them and documents their findings whit the Destination: Play Book introduces what the comfort zone is about. A disposable camera and pencils are also included to aid designers’ findings. The Achievement card pushes designers to complete mission and gain badges!”

I am a very digital graphic designer who mostly uses vectors to create my designs. I hardly ever touch crafts or projects which require hands on but I decided to give it a shot and play. My definition of “play” is to experiment. I want to see what the end product is when I do achieve it as I am unable to visualize it unlike my digital works.

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designcloud:

Urban Exploration

Singapore-based photographer Jared Lim explores geometric patterns in urban environments for his new series entitled “Urban Exploration”.

Reblogged from DesignCloud
smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Argo replica at sunset along the Pagasetic Gulf, Greece
Photo by David Adams (Bilgola, Australia); Pagasetic Gulf, Greece

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Argo replica at sunset along the Pagasetic Gulf, Greece

Photo by David Adams (Bilgola, Australia); Pagasetic Gulf, Greece

Reblogged from Smithsonian Magazine
smithsonianmag:

The Story Behind the Lacoste Crocodile Shirt
Frenchman René Lacoste was a superstar tennis player. In 1926 and 1927, he was ranked number one in the world, and during his tennis career, he won seven Grand Slam championship tournaments. But he found the attire associated with the sport restrictive. Tennis whites, as they were called, consisted of a white, long-sleeved button-down shirt, long pants and a tie. It was a lot of clothing to wear when racing to the net to make an overhead shot.
Lacoste was seeking a shirt that was more accommodating to movement. In a 1979 article from People magazine, he elaborated:

“One day I noticed my friend the Marquis of Cholmondeley wearing his polo shirt on the court,” remembers René. ” ‘A practical idea,’ I thought to myself.” It was so practical, in fact, that René commissioned an English tailor to whip up a few shirts in both cotton and wool. “Soon everyone was wearing them,” he smiles.

One school of thought attributes the shirt’s invention to meeting the needs of British polo players in India in the 19th century. The style was emulated in the U.S. by John Brooks, grandson of the founder of Brooks Brothers, after he saw polo players wearing the shirts in England in the late 1800s–hence, the reason we still call it a polo shirt today. It was also referred to as a tennis shirt—piqué knit cotton, short-sleeved, unstarched collar, a placket opening with buttons at the neck, and a “tennis tail” to help keep the shirt tucked in. (That tail even made an impression on artist-poet Joe Brainard, who, in his book-length poem I Remember includes the line: “I remember when those short-sleeved knitted shirts with long tails (to wear ‘out’) with little embroidered alligators on the pockets were popular.”) In 1926, Lacoste first sported the shirt when he played in the U.S. Open in New York City.
Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.

smithsonianmag:

The Story Behind the Lacoste Crocodile Shirt

Frenchman René Lacoste was a superstar tennis player. In 1926 and 1927, he was ranked number one in the world, and during his tennis career, he won seven Grand Slam championship tournaments. But he found the attire associated with the sport restrictive. Tennis whites, as they were called, consisted of a white, long-sleeved button-down shirt, long pants and a tie. It was a lot of clothing to wear when racing to the net to make an overhead shot.

Lacoste was seeking a shirt that was more accommodating to movement. In a 1979 article from People magazine, he elaborated:

“One day I noticed my friend the Marquis of Cholmondeley wearing his polo shirt on the court,” remembers René. ” ‘A practical idea,’ I thought to myself.” It was so practical, in fact, that René commissioned an English tailor to whip up a few shirts in both cotton and wool. “Soon everyone was wearing them,” he smiles.

One school of thought attributes the shirt’s invention to meeting the needs of British polo players in India in the 19th century. The style was emulated in the U.S. by John Brooks, grandson of the founder of Brooks Brothers, after he saw polo players wearing the shirts in England in the late 1800s–hence, the reason we still call it a polo shirt today. It was also referred to as a tennis shirt—piqué knit cotton, short-sleeved, unstarched collar, a placket opening with buttons at the neck, and a “tennis tail” to help keep the shirt tucked in. (That tail even made an impression on artist-poet Joe Brainard, who, in his book-length poem I Remember includes the line: “I remember when those short-sleeved knitted shirts with long tails (to wear ‘out’) with little embroidered alligators on the pockets were popular.”) In 1926, Lacoste first sported the shirt when he played in the U.S. Open in New York City.

Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.

Reblogged from Smithsonian Magazine

thedsgnblog:

Taylor Benvenutti   |   http://taylorbenvenutti.com

“This is a redesign project for Stauffer’s Animal Crackers. It has fun, attractive colors that work together and individually. The packaging resembles a circus ticket and utilizes elements from vintage circus posters such as an assortment of type, illustrated hands, and decorative ornaments. I wanted to promote Stauffer’s various flavors by giving each a different illustrated mascot. Designs for on-the-go cups are included for each package, as well.”

I am seeking a position that allows me to contribute high-quality creative thinking and further develop my awareness and design aesthetic within a strong team environment. I am also open to interesting and creative freelance projects. I am looking forward to going to new places and increasing my experiences. As a designer, I particularly enjoy including research, concepting, and sketches within my creative process. I also enjoy developing my illustration skills.

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